To: Congress

A CALL TO DECRIMINALIZE THE U.S. IMMIGRATION SYSTEM

A CALL TO DECRIMINALIZE THE U.S. IMMIGRATION SYSTEM

Pass a bill repealing the 1996 immigration laws.

Why is this important?

Since the nation’s inception, immigration policies have been used to maintain white supremacy, stifle dissent, and as a social control tool, silencing alternative voices seeking social, economic, and racial justice and equality.

The 1990s brought us a wave of laws which pulled the rug out from under the advances made by people of color in the U.S., including immigrants, during the Civil Rights movement. As part of this attack on Black and Brown communities, Congress passed the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (“the 1994 Crime Bill”), which re-classified less serious offenses, including drug offenses, as federal felonies, created long mandatory sentences, required state sex offender registries, and provided for $9.7 billion dollars in funding for prisons along with 100,000 new police officers on the street.

Fresh off the 1994 Crime Bill, Congress passed the “1996 Immigration Laws”. The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (“IIR-IRA”) and Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (“AEDPA”), expanded the grounds for deportation by broadening the definition of “aggravated felony,” which was first defined in the 1988 Anti-Drug Abuse Act; establishing harsh sentences for numerous offenses and classes of mandatory detention; stripping away judicial discretion and the right to due process; and retroactively punishing those who already served time for their offenses. These laws also created a perverse incentive for local and federal law enforcement agencies to criminalize communities of color and created the private prison contracting sector.

Amongst all immigrants, Black immigrants are nearly three times more likely to be detained and deported as a result of an alleged criminal offense. Moreover, many Black immigrants are ineligible for any form of relief, including a green card, executive programs such as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) or Temporary Protected Status, or citizenship as a result of criminal contact.

As a result of these laws passed twenty years ago, and a political climate that marginalizes and promotes state violence against immigrant, Black, Brown, and poor communities, the number of immigrants deported has increased ten-fold, tearing apart millions of families. Moreover, the U.S. mass incarceration and immigrant detention and deportation systems have become the largest in the world.


Reasons for signing

  • Black immigrants are nearly three times more likely to be detained and deported as a result of an alleged criminal offense.
  • As the child of two immigrants, it would be a dishonor to not sign this. Since ive clearly heard of the injustice in our immigration system.
  • So tired of the double standard so prevalent in America.

Updates

2016-10-05 20:35:30 -0700

500 signatures reached

2016-08-11 17:14:24 -0700

100 signatures reached

2016-08-05 18:58:53 -0700

50 signatures reached

2016-08-03 17:32:51 -0700

25 signatures reached

2016-08-03 17:25:40 -0700

10 signatures reached