To: Timothy M. Lockwood Associate Director, Regulation and Policy Management Branch (California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation)

Implement the People’s Demands for California’s Proposition 57!

Implement the People’s Demands for California’s Proposition 57!

We are calling on the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to implement the Initiate Justice & Californians United for a Responsible Budget recommendations to the Prop 57 Regular Regulations:
1. Allow all people in prison to earn 50% good time credits,
2. Make all good time credit earning retroactive,
3. Include Third Strikers in the non-violent early parole,
4. Award retroactive Education Merit Credits for each achievement, and
5. Allow every person with a Youth Offender Parole Date or Elderly Parole Date to earn time off of their earliest parole date.

Why is this important?

Last November, Californians overwhelmingly passed Prop 57 with 64% of the vote. Among other things, Prop 57 expands credit earning opportunities for most people in California prisons and allows people convicted of nonviolent offenses to be eligible for early parole consideration. On July 14, 2017, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) released its draft “Regular Regulations,” which outline how they plan to implement this proposition.

While there are many good things in the proposed regulations, such as increased credit opportunities for good behavior and completion of educational and rehabilitative programs, we are concerned that many aspects of the proposed regulations are far too narrow and exclude too many groups of people from opportunities for rehabilitation or early parole consideration.

So, Initiate Justice conducted a survey of more than 2,000 incarcerated people to get their input on how they think Prop 57 should be implemented, since these rules will have direct impacts on their lives. Based on those survey results, and in collaboration with Californians United for a Responsible Budget (CURB), developed the following recommendations:

1. Include Third Strikers in the non-violent early parole:
The proposed regulations state that any person who is “Condemned, incarcerated for a term of life without the possibility of parole, or incarcerated for a term of life with the possibility of parole” is not eligible for nonviolent early parole consideration under Prop 57. We strongly believe that this population should not be excluded from this opportunity. The language of Prop 57 states: “Any person convicted of a non-violent felony offense and sentenced to state prison shall be eligible for parole consideration after completing the full term for his or her primary offense” and that “the full term for the primary offense means the longest term of imprisonment imposed by the court for any offense, excluding the imposition of an enhancement, consecutive sentence, or alternative sentence.” Since a Third Strike is considered an alternative sentence under California state law, it is clear that the voters enacted legislation that included Third Strikers in the nonviolent early parole process.

2. Allow all people in prison to earn 50% good time credits:
The proposed Prop 57 regulations increase good time credits on a graduated scale, depending on the offense the person was convicted of. People serving time for a violent offense will see an increase from 15% to 20% good time credit; people serving time for a serious offense under the Three Strikes Law will see an increase from 20% to 33.3%; and people currently serving time for a non-serious or nonviolent offense will see an increase from 33.3% to 50%. We believe that the incentive for good conduct should be uniform across the board, by equally rewarding all people who remain disciplinary-free, regardless of their conviction. The length of one’s sentence already reflects the severity of the offense, so we do not believe it is necessary to further punish people by limiting their access to good time credits as well.

3. Make all good time credit earning retroactive:
The proposed Prop 57 regulations state that good time credits will be prospective beginning May 1, 2017. We believe this is unjust and fails to recognize the many incarcerated people who have remained disciplinary-free for years without increased incentives. This recommendation is consistent with criminologist James Austin’s 2013 declaration in response to the Three Judge Panel order to reduce CDCR’s population. Here, Austin recommended that all credit earning be retroactive and found that this recommendation could be “implemented without having an impact on public safety or the operation of the state or local criminal justice systems. In fact, they would provide large cost savings that could be used to offset any local criminal justice costs and increase the level of effective programs at the state and local levels.”

4. Award retroactive Education Merit Credits for each achievement:
Award 6-month credit for every vocation, college degree, and G.E.D. obtained by people in prison. Imprisoned people should be able to get at least 6 months off per year per academic and vocational achievement retrospectively since many have completed multiple associate degrees, bachelor’s degrees and certification programs. Educational advancement has been shown to be one of the top factors in reducing the recidivism rate and should be treated with as much importance while further incentivizing people to enroll in academic and vocational programs.

5. Allow people with a Youth Offender / Elderly Parole Date to earn time off their earliest parole date:
The expanded Good Time and Milestone credits made possible should apply to these Youth Offender Parole or Elder Parole Hearing dates, not their original sentence. SB 260 and SB 261 were passed by the Legislature recognizing that many young people were victims of extreme sentencing; therefore, credit earning opportunities made possible by Prop 57 should be applied to their amended hearing dates in order to ensure that participation in rehabilitative programming and remaining disciplinary-free are adequately incentivized. Additionally, Elder Parole is a program that seeks to meet the court deadline to reduce the prison population.

Every incarcerated person who wrote to us expressed deep willingness to embrace their rehabilitation—if given the opportunity to do so. The opportunities presented to people inside will help set them up for success once they are released, and this will ultimately create safer communities for all. Therefore, we request CDCR incorporate these recommendations in drafting the Prop 57 regulations.

How it will be delivered

California, United States

Reasons for signing

  • Hay muchas personas sirviendo condenas que fueron impuestas basadas en la política de setencias mandatorias de CA. Muchos de ellos llevan muchos años sin usar drogas ni violar las reglas. Es hora de que les den una rebaja significativa!
  • Let the votes count and change the law. When the 3 strikes law went into affect, Ca enacted it at 12am the next day. Why is this not happening when it is time to make changes? My husband has been incarcerated for 21 yrs he did not harm anyone. He is a changed man w/ 2 grown daughters who have lived their lives w/o him. He has pd his debt to society. Their are murders, child molesters, & rapists out on the streets, yet he is incarcerated for 35-l How is that justice?
  • Allow non violent offenders to rejoin the community and give back, decrease prison populations and costs, have more room to house people who should NEVER be allowed back in society.

Updates

2017-09-01 16:53:32 -0700

1,000 signatures reached

2017-08-22 07:10:47 -0700

500 signatures reached

2017-08-18 10:34:39 -0700

100 signatures reached

2017-08-18 09:03:17 -0700

50 signatures reached

2017-08-18 07:35:57 -0700

25 signatures reached

2017-08-18 07:13:02 -0700

10 signatures reached